Requirements in English

The New York State Education Department requires four credits in English for graduation. Every student must also pass the English Language Arts Regents assessment in order to graduate. At F-M, each student’s program must include:

1. American Literature 1/2 credit. Courses fulfilling this requirement are 7740, 7755, 7765.

2. One writing course in grades 10, 11, and 12. Such courses are designated as writing within their titles. One of these must be a course in essay writing.

3. A student must earn passing grades in his/her ninth and tenth grade courses as a prerequisite for the Essay Writing courses in eleventh grade.

The English Honors curriculum emphasizes critical literacy processes and practices. As such, it assumes increased intellectual rigor and intensity as students progress through the grade levels. Students who meet the minimum criteria and wish to continue in the honors program regularly exhibit the following traits:

Intellectual curiosity, as demonstrated by consistent engagement with a wide variety of challenging texts, by self-initiative during the reader response process and by consistent, insightful contributions during class discussions.

Intellectual maturity, as demonstrated by comfort with less structure and more ambiguity during class discussions and activities, as well as sustained attention to detail during the critical reading and writing process. (Note: most critical reading and formalized drafting take place independently, out of class, in honors courses.)

       • A strong work ethic, as demonstrated by willingness to read the equivalent of 25-30
        pages of rigorous course material each night, by sustained, independent attention to 
        writing pages of rigorous course material each night, by sustained, independent 
        attention to writing process and refinement during drafting and revision, and by
        willingness to offer and to utilize constructive criticism throughout the writing 
        process.

Courses for Grade 9

English 9 Humanities (7704) - 40 Weeks, 1 Credit

This course combines English Language Arts instruction with Social Studies instruction through cooperative learning projects at an appropriate pace, allowing students to strengthen essential literacy skills in both curricular areas. Curriculum, content and assessment will be consistent with English 9 (7710). Students enrolled in this class must also enroll in Global history and Geography 9 Humanities (0001).

English 9 (7705) - 40 Weeks, 1 Credit

This course is designed for students whose reading and writing skills are developing. Students enrolled in this course are integrated into Regents English 9 but receive assignment or grading modifications. Students enrolled in English 9 are strongly encouraged to enroll in Writing Lab 7701 for extra academic support.

English 9 Regents (7710) - 40 Weeks, 1 Credit

This course is designed for the student who has proficient to above average skills in reading and writing. During the course, students’ reading prompts ideas for writing and speaking. The students frequently work in pairs or groups to discuss their own as well as professional authors’ writings. In one segment of the first semester, the students consider issues related to justice and prejudice. They write, speak, and read books and poems on that theme including To Kill a Mockingbird. In another segment, they are introduced to Greek mythology and read a version of Homer’s Odyssey. Students are also expected to read and keep records and journals of outside reading. Other works include Ender's Game, They Cage the Animals at Night, Of Mice and Men, Speak and poems, as well as Romeo and Juliet.

English 9 Honors (7719) - 40 Weeks, 1 Credit

This course is designed for the student with exceptionally strong reading and writing skills who is capable of taking an idea from the concrete to the abstract. During the course, students’ reading prompts ideas for writing and mini-research projects, which in turn may become materials for oral presentations or group discussions. Students will explore the themes of community, family, justice, tolerance and prejudice in Romeo and Juliet. The students often write in the computer lab and confer with peers about their writing. Students are introduced to Greek mythology and read Homer’s Odyssey in order to form a strong foundation for understanding and appreciating more contemporary literature. Short stories, poems and long works such as To Kill a Mockingbird, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night, Speak, and Things Fall Apart are used to prompt analysis and discussion. To coordinate with Global Studies, multicultural literature is read to encourage an appreciation and understanding of other cultures. Reader response logs are used by students to foster critical thinking skills.

English 9 Honors Interdisciplinary Full Year (8888) - 40 Weeks, 1 Credit

In this year long course, literature and composition instruction are integrated to facilitate some interdisciplinary units in Social Studies and English. Students recommended to take this course must also enroll in the honors Social Studies course in grade nine (0003). Activities in the two courses are designed to meet the needs of students who are strong in both Social Studies and English and to encourage them to associate and apply the concepts and skills that are inherent to both disciplines in numerous cooperative learning activities. As a part of their course work, students study multicultural literature as related to the social studies curriculum, and participate in a variety of listening, speaking, writing and research activities. As this is a humanities program, students will be expected to successfully engage in cooperative learning activities. Texts may include To Kill a Mockingbird, The Odyssey, Siddhartha, Romeo & Juliet, Granada, Girl in Hyacinth Blue and Pope Joan. A reader response log may be required of all students to help encourage more in-depth thinking about the content of their reading assignments.

First Semester Courses for Grade 10

Writing and Speech (7720) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is designed for the students who are continuing to develop their writing skills. Students will be guided through pre-writing and editing exercises as they develop writing pieces. Students will experience both personal and literary writing. Students' confidence and effectiveness in speaking will be developed in a speech unit. Vocabulary development is an integral part of this course. Students enrolled in this course will be integrated into Writing & Speech Regents but will receive grading or assignment modifications.

Writing and Speech Regents (7730) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This writing course is designed for the student whose writing abilities are considered proficient for a high school sophomore. The purpose of this course is to involve the student in frequent and carefully planned writing, including pieces that are expository, narrative, descriptive, and analytical. The subjects for writing are chosen from both the student’s world and the literary world. During a unit on speech, students participate in various listening and speaking activities. The unit is intended to continue building the student’s poise, confidence, and effectiveness in speaking and reading aloud. Vocabulary development is also an integral part of this course.

Writing and Speech Honors (7739) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This writing course is intended for skilled students who write with correctness and clarity and are ready to concern themselves with refining the style and heightening the interest in their papers. A range of special writing effects are explored through student experimentation and the study of accomplished writers. Revising and rewriting are a crucial part of the process in this course as is vocabulary instruction. Students will complete synthesis and research projects, and participate in various listening and speaking activities. The unit is intended to continue building the student’s poise, confidence, and effectiveness in speaking and reading aloud. Students are required to give a manuscript speech, an argumentative speech, and an oral presentation of their research paper.

English 10 Honors Interdisciplinary Full Year (8889)40 Weeks, 1 Credit

This year long course continues the aims of Interdisciplinary Honors English 9, and as in Interdisciplinary 9, students recommended for this course must also enroll in Interdisciplinary Honors Social Studies in grade ten (0013). As this is a humanities program, students will be expected to successfully engage in cooperative learning activities. Interdisciplinary units and presentations are designed to challenge students strong in both disciplines and to encourage them to associate and deepen the concepts and skills inherent in English and Global Studies. A jottings notebook may be required to help develop student thinking and writing. Literature studies may include 1984, Brave New World, Lord of the Flies, Night, and Tempest as well as a variety of short stories and poems.

Second Semester Courses for Grade 10

Perspectives in Literature (8723) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is designed for the student who experiences some difficulty in both reading and writing about literature, which includes poetry, short stories, and either a play or a novel. Students enrolled in this course are integrated into Regents 10 (Perspectives) but receive assignment and grading modifications.

Perspectives in Literature Regents (8733)20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is designed for students who are proficient in English. Students will read and write about short stories, plays, novels, and poetry which focus on varying perspectives and ideas in literature. In their writing, students will create, develop and support controlling ideas based on literary texts. In addition, students will deliver a minimum of two speeches such as a manuscript or dynamic duo speech. Major works may include Midsummer Night's Dream, Night, and A Separate Peace.

Perspectives in Literature Honors (8740)20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is designed for students who are strong readers and sophisticated writers. Students will be expected to create their own meanings from texts and support their positions with well developed, text-based reasoning. Students will work in a variety of genres. Major works may include Midsummer Night's Dream, Julius Caesar, Crossing Blood, Night, The Color Purple, Lord of the Flies and A Separate Peace.

First Semester Courses for Grade 11

American Literature (7740) -  20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is intended for students who will benefit from a more deliberate instructional pace. The course approaches American literature from the themes of danger, freedom, and human relationships. Works studied may include Catcher in the Rye, The Great Gatsby, Death of a Salesman, Fences, poems, and a variety of high interest short stories. Writing assignments will include practicing the writing tasks required on the English Language Arts assessment, in addition to other types of writing. All grade eleven students must take the English Language Arts Regents assessment. Students enrolled in this course will be integrated into American Literature Regents but will receive grading or assignment modifications.

American Literature Regents (7755) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

The literature in this course explores some of the rich variety of cultural identities that make up America as well as concerns reflected in the work of American authors. Writing assignments for this course focus on exploration and analysis of literature and include practice for the English Language Arts Regents Examination in June. Literature may include The Great Gatsby, Into the Wild, Catcher in the Rye, Fences, other long fiction or drama, and a variety of poems and short stories. All grade eleven students must take the English Language Arts Regents assessment.

American Literature Honors (7765) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 credit

This is a course designed for juniors with strong reading comprehension skills, who are stylistically sophisticated in writing. Honors American Literature delves into concerns reflected in the work of American authors. Students explore short stories, longer fiction, drama, and poetry. Texts may include The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, Catcher in the Rye, and Fences. Writing assignments for this course focus on literary analysis and include practice for the English Language Arts Regents Examination in June. All grade eleven students must take the English Language Arts Regents assessment.

Second Semester Courses for Grade 11

Essay Writing (8745) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is designed for the junior whose writing still has some weakness in structure and mechanics. During the semester, students are given instruction in clarity of expression: they write essays of exposition and persuasion with the purpose of improving their topic development and logic. The logical process required in the pre-writing stage is explored in large and small group work. Special attention is given to writing which will support the students' efforts on the English Language Arts Regents assessment which all grade eleven students must take. Students enrolled in this course will be integrated into Essay Writing Regents but will receive grading or assignment modifications.

Essay Writing Regents (8759) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

In this course students focus on the writing process and writing essays responding to, analyzing, and utilizing outside texts, with a focus on peer and self-editing, including all types of literature. "Shorter" pieces such as poetry and short fiction, and the frequently ignored genre of non-fiction (such as essays, profiles, biographies) are the primary focus. Students work on improving the theses statement of their essays, logical development, and style. Writing assignments include practice in answering the composition questions which appear on the Regents Exam in June. Portfolio evaluation may be employed. All grade eleven students must take the English Language Arts Regents assessment.

Essay Writing Honors (8769) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

Students in the honors sections are expected to be able to write sophisticated compositions that demonstrate logical development, an awareness of style and a clear voice. This section of Essay Writing is designed for students with exceptional writing ability, many of whom will be entering the Advanced Placement or Project Advance programs in their senior years. The course focuses on analyzing various genres of literature and writing various types of essays: personal writing and personal college statements, literary analysis of prose and poetry, the research essay, as well as preparation for the English Language Arts Regents Examination in June. Students work on improving the thesis statement of their essays, logical development, and style. Works read may include Macbeth or Othello, and "shorter" pieces such as poetry, short fiction, and non-fiction. All grade eleven students must take the English Language Arts Regents assessment.

First Semester Courses for Grade 12

Senior Writing (7775)20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is designed for students who still need instruction in the conventions of standard English and in adapting their writing to different purposes and audiences. The course includes practical writing (e.g., personal statement, research paper, argumentative essay, letters of application, and literary/film critiques). Students enrolled in this course may be integrated into College Prep Writing, but receive assignment and grading modifications.

College Prep Writing Regents (7790) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

The primary aim of this course is to teach college bound students how to write a variety of kinds of essays which may include the personal essay, the personal college statement, resume writing, papers of literary analysis involving poetry and the novel, informational papers, research writing, and the argumentative essay. Much of the writing may take place in the computer lab where instruction can be individualized. The course may also be further augmented with outside reading of selected biographies and autobiographies. The course culminates with a writing portfolio which has been constructed throughout the semester.

English Full Year Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) (7798) - 40 Weeks, 1/2 Credit Each

Prerequisite: Score of 85 or above on English Regents Exam

English teacher's recommendation

SUPA English is a college level course whose program is sponsored and supervised by Syracuse University. It offers students the opportunity to earn up to six hours of college credit. Any student who enrolls in SUPA is strong enough in English to "skip" twelfth grade English. Students who choose SUPA should already have had some experience in honors English courses. Since the course requires not only frequent writing but extensive literary analysis, students choosing it should have achieved a B+ or above in eleventh grade honors English courses. A reading and writing assignment over the summer is part of the course requirement for all students enrolled.

SUPA English is divided into two parts. The fall semester, the equivalent to S.U.’s Writing 105, provides an intensive experience in writing academic essays. Students work on formal and informal writing with an emphasis on the invention portfolio. The focus on academic writing includes lengthy, dense readings, and longer papers totaling 3,000-5,000 words. The second section, ETS 142, focuses on reading as a cultural practice to explore ways of reading a particular work in the terms of the culture which produced it. They write frequent short analytic essays and two non literary responses to narratives totaling 3,000 to 5,000 words.

Those who choose to register for college credit pay a non-refundable tuition fee for the full year to Syracuse University. The fee is approximately $500.00. The course will appear as Syracuse University Project Advance on the student's transcript.

For students who choose not to take this course for credit, the course is designated College Level (CL) English on the transcript.

NOTE: Registration of students who score below 85 on the English Regents in June is reevaluated. Past experience has shown that Regents scores correlate highly with success in the SUPA English program. Students who score below 85 are advised that College Prep Writing better prepares them for college freshman English.

English Full Year Advanced Placement (AP) (7799) - 40 Weeks, 1/2 Credit Each

Prerequisite: Score of 85 or above on English Regents Exam

English teacher's recommendation

This course is part of a national program administered by the College Entrance Examination Board that has been recognized by many prestigious colleges and universities. It offers, for students who opt to take the A.P. exam, the opportunity to gain up to six hours of college English credit, advanced standing, or both credit and standing at the college they attend. Amount of credit and level of standing are based on the student’s performance on the Advanced Placement exam in May; the fee for this exam is approximately $85.00. Advanced Placement English assumes that the students have mastered the elements of composition and are prepared to use their writing skills to discuss literature. A.P. is organized on a seminar model allowing students the experience of exploring and organizing their responses to literature. A wide variety of important literary works are read from old and emerging canons of world literature, such as the novels of Austen, Bronte, Conrad, Dickens, and Morrison, plays by Shakespeare, Ibsen or Tom Stoppard and other modern playwrights, and short stories and poetry, both traditional and modern.NOTE: Registration of students who score below 85 on the English Regents in June are reevaluated. Past experience has shown that Regents scores correlate highly with success in the AP English program. Students who score below 85 are advised that College Prep Writing will better prepare them for college freshman English.

Second Semester Courses for Grade 12

Our Literary Heritage (8770) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is intended as a follow-up to Senior Writing. Students enrolled in this course are integrated into Cultural Studies: Media, Film, or Drama, but receive assignment and grading modifications.

Textual Studies: Drama (8780) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This course is designed for seniors interested in studying dramatic literature and participating in dramatic activities, improvisation, and theatre games. Students read and analyze plays, write essays and perform short scenes from the texts studied. The course is designed to build an awareness of the considerations involved in translating the written text of a dramatic work into a living production, to deepen students’ understanding of the art of the theatre, and to develop their acting talents. Students are asked to interpret scripts they have read and demonstrate this understanding through their own performances. Texts include Hamlet, A Doll House, The Bald Soprano, as well as contemporary texts such as the Laramie Project.

Cultural Studies: Filmstudy (8790) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This Regents level course is designed to prepare second semester seniors for the complex reading and analysis tasks related to the growing influence of film. By focusing on the cinematic techniques that directors use to shape a story, the course will teach students to explore the art of the film and the relationship between movies and culture. Students view films that span several decades and a variety of themes. Films may include Apocalypse Now, Psycho, Usual Suspects, Thelma and Louise, L.A. Confidential, and The Graduate.

Textual Studies: Media (8793) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This Regents level course is designed to prepare second semester seniors for the complex reading and analysis tasks related to the growing influence of media on culture. By focusing on the culture in which they were produced, students analyze news programs, television, magazines, newspapers, performing and visual art. Students study cultural artifacts which span several decades and a variety of themes and explore the relationship between a culture and the society that creates it. The course also examines the role media plays in developing a specific language for a culture.

English Syracuse University Project Advance (8798) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: SUPA English 1

This course is a continuation of SUPA English 1.

English Advanced Placement (8799)20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: A.P. English 1

This course is a continuation of Advanced Placement English 1.

College Prep Writing (8795, Repeat) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit

This second semester course is only available to seniors who have been unsuccessful in College Prep Writing first semester.

Elective Courses

Writing Lab (7701, 8701)20 Weeks, 1/4 Credit, Grades 9-12, Alternate Days

This writing lab is designed to meet the needs of students who need to strengthen their writing and who are enrolled in regular English classes. The purpose of the lab is to provide these students with a place to improve their skills in a laboratory setting. Students receive individualized instruction and may bring writing to the lab that they are working on in content areas. There are also some writing assignments generated within the lab itself. Students may elect to attend the writing lab in either the fall or spring semester or all year. This course is required for students who score at level one on the 8th grade ELA Assessment. Students who score at level two or low level three of the 8th grade English Language Arts assessment are strongly encouraged to take this course. Students may elect to take WRITING LAB for two years and earn up to one credit towards their high school diploma.

English Language Arts (7702), Regents Review, Mandated (8702) - 20 Weeks, No Credit, Grades 11-12

Students whose scores fall below 55% on the New York State English Language Arts Regents Exam in their junior year will be required to enroll in this course. This review course will concentrate on the four tasks that make up the writing intensive English Regents exam. Students receive individualized instruction to prepare them to take the ELA Regents again. Juniors who are designated as needing extra support may be enrolled in this class before they take the ELA exam.

Reading Lab (7800, 8800)20 Weeks, 1/4 Credit, Grades 9-12, Alternate Days, Pass/Fail Grade

Reading is mandated for all students who fall below the state reference point as determined by their score on the 8th grade English Language Arts assessment. Additionally, this course is offered to those students enrolled in reading classes in grade eight who are reading significantly below grade level or if recommended by a reading teacher. Credit is earned by non-mandated students. This course is intended to increase the student’s efficiency in reading skills necessary for success in reading in high school, college, vocational training, and adult life. The student’s own English and Social Studies texts provide most of the content material. The focus is on comprehension, critical reading, study skills, and vocabulary.

Journalism Workshop (8725) - 40 Weeks, 1/2 Credit, Grades 9-12, Alternate Days

Students in journalism workshop explore the variety of print media for which journalists write, and learn editing and polishing skills. They choose and produce their own journalism projects, and will have the opportunity to learn layout and design as they work together to produce a newspaper containing feature articles, news stories, editorials, reviews, and interviews written in the course. This workshop may be taken more than once.

Broadcast Journalism and Television Production Workshop (8726) - 40 Weeks, 1/2 Credit, Grades 9-12, Alternate Days

Prerequisite: Journalism Workshop, Communication Systems or Senior Status

Students in Broadcast Journalism and Television production Workshop explore a variety of non-print media for which journalists write. They write for radio and television, create and produce news shows, commercials, and in-depth programs. Students are responsible for producing a daily program that includes school announcements, current school events, and features. Students will also learn editing and polishing skills, technical aspects of broadcast production, and speaking in a public forum.

Advanced Broadcast Journalism (7727) and Television Production Workshop (8727) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit, Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Broadcast Journalism Workshop

Advanced Broadcast Journalism is designed to supplement the experience of Broadcast Journalism and Television Production Workshop. Students are responsible for production, direction or technical production of the daily program as well as for special broadcast projects and assignments. Students in Advanced Broadcast Journalism are fluent in all areas of broadcast production, write and edit scripts and proposals for projects, and maintain a working broadcast studio. Students will become familiar with several forms of digital editing, including I-Life and Final Cut. Advanced script writing is mastered using a professional format. This workshop may be taken more than once.

Acting Workshop (8771) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit, Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Theatre, Dramatic Arts & Literature, or Drama course or by permission of instructor

This course is for advanced drama students who wish to rehearse and perform challenging roles for various types of productions. Activities may include performing plays for primary grade or middle school students, scenes for drama festivals, or plays for options assemblies. Students opting to take this course must be available occasionally for a ninth period rehearsal or an after school performance. Students may elect this course in the Spring semester. This workshop may be taken more than once.

8895 Creative Writing (8895) - 40 Weeks, 1/2 Credit, Grades 9-12, Alternate Days

Creative Writing is for serious students of writing who are enthusiastic about reworking and polishing prose or poetry, and who may then seek out interested publishers and submit typed copies for consideration. While narrative fiction and poetry are the primary focus of the course, other writing such as magazine articles, short subjects, or technical writing may be undertaken. Success in this course hinges on regular conferences with the teacher, original works begun and completed, and participation in peer evaluation of manuscripts. This course may be taken more than once.

Theatre (7770) - 40 Weeks, 1 Credit, Grades 9-12

Theatre is a full-year course offered to students interested in learning the basics of acting, in becoming acquainted with the other theatre arts, and in studying major periods in theatre history. Numerous opportunities are afforded students to perform in scenes from established plays and in improvisation and skits. Other activities include projects in set lighting, costume and makeup design, play-writing, directing, and script analysis. This course fulfills the Regents requirement for Art or Music.

The History and Structure of the English Language (7780) - 20 Weeks 1/2 Credit, Grades 10-12

Our perceptions of the world, our thoughts, our behavior are all shaped by the language we use. The language we choose affects how others respond to us: we can mislead and manipulate with language; we can isolate, insult or draw people to us. One of the purposes of this course will be to make us aware of the social, political, and economic power of language. Additionally, it provides information about English grammar and usage and about the origins and development of the English language. This course is especially helpful for juniors preparing for the SAT exams.

The Rhetoric of Race in American Culture (7735) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit, Grades 10-12

What is in a name? The course begins with an exploration into this question, as it relates to ethnic and racial identity. It then progresses from an inquiry into language as defining personal and social identity, to language, within it historical context, to language within its political context. Throughout the semester, students will explore the ways in which radical and ethnic issues are framed in our culture's ongoing, collective conversations. Texts such as memoirs, essays, historic documents, documentaries, news articles, poetry, drama, advertisements, political cartoons, published speeches and fine art, will inform students' considerations of the role language plays in shaping attitudes toward race and ethnicity. When scheduling permits, students participating in the course will broaden the dialogue by exchanging ideas, both in person, and through electronic communication with Nottingham High School students enrolled in the same course.

Poetry (8785) - 20 Weeks, 1/2 Credit, Grades 10-12

This class explores poetry from contemporary American writers and from writers around the globe and throughout history. This course may count as a second semester senior requirement. Emphasis is on reading and analyzing poetry, on discussing the lives and literary techniques of individual poets, on identifying and understanding work from various "schools" of poetry, and on individual interpretation of poetry text based on both personal experience and understanding of literary devices. Students may also ask for help with their own experiments in writing poetry.

Requirements in English

The New York State Education Department requires four credits in English for graduation. Every student must also pass the English Language Arts Regents assessment in order to graduate. At F-M, each student’s program must include:

1. American Literature 1/2 credit. Courses fulfilling this requirement are 7740, 7755, 7765.

2. One writing course in grades 10, 11, and 12. Such courses are designated as writing within their titles. One of these must be a course in essay writing.

3. A student must earn passing grades in his/her ninth and tenth grade courses as a prerequisite for the Essay Writing courses in eleventh grade.

The English Honors curriculum emphasizes critical literacy processes and practices. As such, it assumes increased intellectual rigor and intensity as students progress through the grade levels. Students who meet the minimum criteria and wish to continue in the honors program regularly exhibit the following traits:

Intellectual curiosity, as demonstrated by consistent engagement with a wide variety of challenging texts, by self-initiative during the reader response process and by consistent, insightful contributions during class discussions.

Intellectual maturity, as demonstrated by comfort with less structure and more ambiguity during class discussions and activities, as well as sustained attention to detail during the critical reading and writing process. (Note: most critical reading and formalized drafting take place independently, out of class, in honors courses.)

       • A strong work ethic, as demonstrated by willingness to read the equivalent of 25-30
        pages of rigorous course material each night, by sustained, independent attention to 
        writing pages of rigorous course material each night, by sustained, independent 
        attention to writing process and refinement during drafting and revision, and by
        willingness to offer and to utilize constructive criticism throughout the writing 
        process.

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